Friday, March 25, 2016

The Prelapsarians By John Gaiserich Review



The Prelapsarians
By John Gaiserich

What is the cost of compassion in a dark and deadly world?
EPIC FANTASY, PHILOSOPHY & POST-APOCALYPTIC ACTION COLLIDE IN “AGGRESSIVELY CAPTIVATING” DYSTOPIAN DEBUT 
Pray for revenge, and God will turn a deaf ear.
– Russian proverb 
            If one commits an act of vengeance, are they ever justified? Or have they, by adopting their offender’s tactics in retaliation, become just as vile?
The full-length debut from emerging American novelist John Gaiserich, The Prelapsarians, is a gripping examination of human morality when comfort and security are stretched to their breaking points – and poses important questions that will resonate with readers long after they’ve turned the last page.
            Set twenty-five years after the eruption of the Yellowstone super volcano and the world war that followed, The Prelapsarians follows the scattered, dwindling remnants of the human race as they struggle to eke out a primordial existence under the thumb of a group of greedy Oligarchs. For those born before the disaster -- called the Prelapsarians -- the future looks hopeless. But there are some who choose to resist.
            In the south of Russia, a band of retired mercenaries -- led by the formidable, cold, morally ambiguous Andrei Evgenyevich Myshkin -- seek to undermine the Oligarchs' power. Their ardor is invigorated when they join forces with Ani Ohanyan, a headstrong, idealistic young smuggler with dreams of a brighter future and a penchant for getting herself into trouble. Together, their quest takes them across the Caucasus Mountains, through the ruins of once-prosperous cities, and to the shores of the Caspian Sea… along the way facing backroom intrigue, fierce battles, and brewing tensions that threaten to turn them against one another. But amidst their trials, the greatest struggles they face may be against their own demons.
“Early on in the story, one of my characters muses on how much easier charity and compassion were in the old world, when people knew they had a life of luxury waiting for them when they went home at night,” says Gaiserich. “In the aftermath of a worldwide catastrophe, I ask: would humans continue to show benevolence, or would they revert to a Darwinian ‘might is right’ way of life?”
            Heralded by IndieReader.com as “an aggressively captivating meditation on faith and morality as civilization collapses, rebuilds, and threatens to fall once more,” The Prelapsarians introduces Gaiserich as a new and notable voice in the dystopian fiction arena – and is not-to-be-missed by any lover of character-driven, action-packed, philosophically significant storytelling.
Hailing from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, John Gaiserich began writing fiction in 2009. His debut novel, The Prelapsarians, draws heavily on his interest in Russian history and culture, and is influenced by the films of Andrei Tarkovsky. In addition to writing, John works as an aviation professional and takes a great interest in the aerospace industry. 
Connect with John Gaiserich on FacebookTwitterFlickr and atwww.JohnGaiserich.com.
The Prelapsarians is available in both paperback and e-book formats via Amazon.



My review:
  I tried really hard to get into this book. I couldn't. It was like trying to read a Dean Koontz book where the first five chapters are spent just trying to set the scene. All I could see was a book version of some movie like The Book of Eli. If you are into covert ops, sci-fi, post apocalyptic books, honestly, you will probably love it. I am very picky about my sci-fi but I decided to give this a try. It didn't do it for me, but I am not going to say it is a "bad" book, it just didn't suit my taste. It did get better as time went on, but it had already lost me in the beginning so I didn't give it a fair chance. The writing is very well, very in-depth, and very researched. I would love to see a book by him in some of the genres I normally read. I would give him another chance. It was more that this book wasn't compatible with my taste, not anything the writer did or didn't do. One thing I did really like about this book is that it will make you take a very long look in your mirror before you go to bed and question a lot of things about yourself. So go on, give it a shot, or are you scared to see who you REALLY are?